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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 28, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. the prime minister mounts a strong defence of the free market — a day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a "crisis of legitimacy". a free—market economy operating under the right roles and regulations is the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. the fourth round of the brexit negotiations draws to a close in brussels today — with accusations of not enough progress being made. ryanair is breaking the law in its handling of flight cancellations — according to the boss of the uk's aviation regulator. also, could ben stokes‘s hopes of touring australia this winter have turned to ashes? video footage has emerged, allegedly showing all—rounder ben stokes in a violent brawl outside a nightclub. he has apologised to the ecb and is
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said to be devastated. and hugh hefner — the founder of playboy magazine, how will he be remembered? good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may has mounted a strong defence of the free market, a day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a "crisis of legitimacy". in a speech to the bank of england, the prime minister said the financial crisis and globalisation had brought concerns that the economy was not working for everyone but capitalism remained the best way
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for a living standards to grow. lets head to westminster now — and our political correspondent, jonathan blake. by by virtue of the timing ofjeremy corbyn putts—mac speech yesterday and theresa may putts—mac speech today, we have set out very starkly this huge contrast in ideologies, if you like. and theresa may arguing that the free—market economy is underrated to sustain people's living standards. there's the real chisora people. their speech at the bank of england this morning was to mark 20 years of its independence. a loving it to set interest rates free from political intervention. it was of course a decision taken by the labour government back in 1997 after the landslide win. it underlies the central court order argument today, that a free—market economy with as
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little as possible state intervention would allow businesses to flourish is, the economy to grow and living standards, as she puts it, to rise. it is, she says, the only way for a modern economy to function, and depicted address, to introduce more states and eventing, would mean more borrowing, higher taxes, and a drop in living standards. he is a little bit of what she had this day. we should never forget the immense value and potential of a free— market never forget the immense value and potential of a free—market economy operating with the right rules and regulations. when counties make the transition from close, restricted ce ntro transition from close, restricted centro planned economies to open free—market economies, the same things happen. life expectancy increases and infant mortality files. access to education is widened, and rates of illiteracy plummet. bassett rescission" life is extended, and more people have the chance to contribute. it is an open,
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free market economies that technological breakthroughs are made by strands from, improve and save lives. it is an open free—market economies that personal freedoms of liberties and assurance protection. if free— market economy liberties and assurance protection. if free—market economy operating under the right rules and regulations is the greatest editor of collective human progress ever created. it was a new combination that led societies move out of darkness and into the light of the modern edge. of course, what we were hearing yesterday from jeremy corbyn was a very different analyses and a very different solution. far from being the right way are the only way, as theresa may putot, jeremy corbyn in his speech to the labour party conference yesterday said that things need to change. he set edinburgh thames house he views the system deidre brock in. he said the time has come from an investment from government, industry and the renationalisation of the utilities
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and greater investment to improve living standards. he is a little bit of what he said in his speech. the capitalist system still faces a crisis of legitimacy stemming from the crash. now is the time that government takes an active role in restructuring our economy. now is it time that corporate boardrooms are held accountable for their actions. now is the time that the developed the new model of economic management to replace the failed neoliberalism. that is why labour is looking not just to repair the damage done by asta na just to repair the damage done by astana to to transform our economy with a new and dynamic role for the public sector, particularly with the private sector has let scarce
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whatsoever in the field. jeremy corbyn cleaning out his vision. at the labour party came to power, it is clear they would seek to invest more in public infrastructure, and asta na more in public infrastructure, and astana day, take back into public control utilities and perhaps the ra i lwa ys control utilities and perhaps the railways as well. it is in stark contrast about theresa may said today. it is interesting to dwell on the fact that the prime minister and the fact that the prime minister and the conservatives now have to make the conservatives now have to make the argument, it is not a long time there has been consented in british politics about the free—market beanie right before the economy to grow and living standards to rise, but neither a choice. there is a choice on the fundamental way on buy the economy operates. thank you very much. let mejust the economy operates. thank you very much. let me just so you this scene in brussels. this is the scene in brussels as eu chief negotiator michel barnier and brexit secretary david davis prepare to give an update following the latest
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round of the brexit talks. we'll be there live when a news conference begins shortly. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched "enforcement action" against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption. it's the first step towards court action. sarah corker reports. it has been a turbulent few weeks for europe's biggest airline. ryanair blames its cancellation chaos on messing up pilot holiday rosters. but the civil aviation authority has accused the no—frills carrier of persistently misleading passengers. it said ryanair was wrong to claim it did not have to re—route customers on rival airlines. the warning came as more cancellations were announced yesterday. and this second raft
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of cancellations will affect 18,000 flights, disrupting another 400,000 passengers. the airline says it will place 25 fewer planes, to cut the risk of further cancellations. and more than 30 routes will be suspended, including popular tourist routes like london stansted to edinburgh and glasgow. and, earlier this month, the airline cancelled up to 50 flights a day until the end of october. it has now also dropped its plan to buy the italian carrier alitalia. the company insists it has no pilot shortage. passengers are being offered a full refund and vouchers of up to 80 euros, while ryanair could end up in court. sarah corker, bbc news. rya nair has issued a response, saying... "we already comply fully with all eu261 legislation, are meeting with the caa and will comply fully with whatever requirements they ask us to." last up to our business
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correspondent. doctor us about this intervention by the civil aviation authority. the (aa is really getting very frustrated with ryanair. there have been warnings over the last few weeks that they weren't doing what they should do under the terms of that regulation that you mention. it sets out passenger's rights if the flights are cancelled. we are dealing with the pretty unusual situation, where they have cancelled and offer lots of flight in a short space of time, and there have been a lot of complaints that quite simply the company is not doing what it should supposed, which is to get to the destinations, if necessary, on another airline. after that response, has worried at the company at the moment because of this intervention? and what more can you do? ryanair is going to be under a lot of pressure. it is under
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pressure from bca and consumer authorities as well. the problem for them that is light at based on a low—cost model. 0ften, them that is light at based on a low—cost model. often, when a flight is cancelled, the passengers' right to compensation is a lot greater than the actual ticket. they have resisted this over a number of yea rs, resisted this over a number of years, they have never been in favour of the regulation. now, they may try delaying tactics, either me comply, we don't know. if they delay, they may end up in court. there is an issue of the number of pilots they have two cover all its flight pilots they have two cover all its flight path. you then find them come pounding this with the customer confidence as she. it is certainly a big pr gaffe. 0ne liner came out but yesterday was this pre—emptive cancellation of 18,000 flights. it was designed to put the issue to bed. it is easier to cazenove when there aren't many beacons than it would be to cancel at short notice and provide a high level of compensation. but what they have
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done is create a new pr gaffe to say that passengers were not entitled to fly on another airline. 0n that passengers were not entitled to fly on another airline. on some of those roots, they may not have a choice. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do in the event of a uk terror attack, and are also warning eyewitnesses to flee the scene, rather than trying to film atrocities on mobile phones. the call follows a number of attacks in the uk this year, including the manchester arena bombing, which targeted people at a pop concert. andy moore reports. i've trained in taekwondo for 16 years. the new video, aimed specifically at young people, features some famous faces, with a message that police hope is becoming familiar to the british public. do you know what i'd do, in a knife or gun terror attack? i'd run. hide. tell. this campaign has been launched against a backdrop of a wave of terror attacks, including the manchester arena bomb, where many young people were killed and injured.
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their message is to run if you can, hide if you can't, and then tell apologies for moving away from that report. we are going to brussels where a news conference is underway. we set out a clear, pragmatic approach designed to help secure an agreement that works for all sides. it builds on a hugely significant work that has gone on a cross government over the last year that has seen us published 1a papers over the future relationship. there have been 2—macro silk white papers. this week, my negotiating team came armed with details of the proposals set out by the prime minister. thanks to the constructive and determined manner which both sides have
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conducted these negotiations, we are making decisive steps forward. after four rounds, when i looked across the full range of issues, i am clear we have made considerable progress on the issues that matter, increasing certainty for citizens and visitors, providing reassurance to our eu partners and a ghastly financial obligations, and agreeing to some of the key principles and latency issues in northern ireland and ireland. i make no secret of wanting to talk about the future and the importance of this to businesses and citizens in both the european union and in the united kingdom. the prime minister's speech sets out the skill of an ambition. as well as a proposalfor a simple, skill of an ambition. as well as a proposal for a simple, clear, time—limited period of protection. this period, based on current terms, will ensure people, businesses, and public services only have to plan for one set of changes. i believe there should be quick to agree once
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there's a mandate to explore it with us. as the prime minister said last week, our shared future can only be found on partnership, friendship, and most importantly, truss. this is what discussions this week have been about. it brings me to the detail of our discussions. as citizens rights, we made real progress on issues that will enable citizens on both sides to lead their lives broadly as they do now. we will publish an updated table later today which will shock many areas of agreement. i am pleased to report that we have agreed most aspects of social security coordination, building on the progress on the last round of talks. the united kingdom thinks that in some cases we must go beyond current european union law and order to protect citizens. for example, we have offered to the european union guaranteed right of return for set of eu citizens in the uk and a tonne
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for onward movement rights, ifor ireland movement for duty nurses are currently live within 27. i look forward to the response to this offer. we must also acknowledge that a major question remains about the enforcement of citizens' rights after really. the uk has been clear that as a third country outside the european union, edward not be right for this role to be performed by the european court of justice. for this role to be performed by the european court ofjustice. we have listen to concerns. as a direct result, we are committed to incorporating the final withdrawal agreement fairly with uk law. we also recognise the need to ensure consistent interpretation of your —— european union law. again, discussions have been productive. we
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have provided further reassurance on how european citizens can apply for state is once wheelie, and we know those who are already holding permanent residency documents should not have to go through the full process. this is a fairly thinking on how to ensure this does not happen. it is all about providing certainty, clarity, stability for european union citizens in the uk and uk citizens living in the 27. it represents pragmatic compromises to our shared challis, ending anxiety for those citizens. they shape of that deal is becoming clear. we continue to work in the interest of citizens on both sides. an her recent speech, the prime minister reassured our european partners that they will not need to pay more receive less of a remainder of the current eu budget plan as a result of decision to leave. the uk has
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expend this reassuring in detail to the commission. the prime minister also made clear that the uk will honour its made during the period of our membership. we are not yet at the state of specifying a sad about this commitment are, that will need to come later, nevertheless, negotiation teams have helped constructive negotiations on how detailed technical issues relating to this. this work is necessary so that when the time comes, we can which a political agreement, and discussions will continue. in edges that arise with northern ireland and ireland, we have had a constructive discussion and made progress in some areas. both sides recognise the unique situation on the island of ireland must fully inform any solutions. we welcome the guiding principles paper which reaffirms a high degree of alignment between us
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on this vital strand. specifically, this week, we began drafting john principles on preserving the common travel area and associated right. we have both agreed that the good friday agreement citizen rights must be upheld. we are working together and how this can be best done. the joint work agreed in august the budget in mind is moving along at pace. we are addressing complex issues here, but both are resolved to finding imaginative solutions. we owe it to the people of northern ireland and across the island of ireland and across the island of ireland to see these commitments through. we remain firmly committed to making as much progress as possible relating to abbas to all of the eu institutions, and they must be resolved before our departure. i'm encouraged by the progress we have made this week. the eu welcomes our clear statement that they will maintain the same standards and a future nuclear safeguards which will be run by our existing nuclear
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regulator. we are now close to reaching agreement on the vast majority of issues set out on our position papers on this issue. of course, we want to have a close and effective elation ship with you not in the future, and the best way to ensure this is to press on with discussions and partnership. 0n other issues, we have had constructive discussion. i technical issues, in some areas, we have agreed on core issues. at the beginning of the week, i mention the uk's wheel and ongoing, and to our european friends and allies. 0ur commitment to that ideal has been clear in these negotiations, and thoseissues clear in these negotiations, and those issues which relate to our departure from the institutions. as isaid at departure from the institutions. as i said at the start, this one was a vital part. we have made important progress and capitalise on momentum
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created by the prime minister's speech. we are working quickly to a number of complex issues, yet there remains some points with other discussion and pragmatism will be required to reach agreement. it is true that there are differences of opinion. but with the continued diligence and creativity of our teams, iam diligence and creativity of our teams, i am confident we can resolve these. the uk's departure from the european union is inevitably complex, and it is an all our interest for the negotiations to succeed. we must neverforget interest for the negotiations to succeed. we must never forget the biggest picture. britain want to be the european union's strongest friend and partner. we want us posted five —— we want us both the side side by side. i look forward to continuing the negotiations. thank you. thank you, david, and good afternoon to all of you. the prime minister's speech in france has
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created at new dynamic and our negotiations. and we have felt this during the negotiations this week, as david just said. on monday, i said that we needed a moment of clarity. david and i, as well as our teams, worked well together. i want to thank both teams for the dedication, the professionalism, and an expertise. we managed to create clarity on some points. 0n others, however, more work remains to be done, and we are not there yet. but we will keep working in a constructive spirit until we reach a
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deal on the essential principles of the uk's orderly withdrawal. allow me to briefly outline what was agreed this week and what more needs to be done. i'm citizen' rights, our priority, the uk as give a direct effect to the withdrawal agreement. this is very important. it will give the assurance to our citizens that they will be able to invoke their rights as defined by the right to withdrawal agreement before uk courts. we agreed to guarantee for this citizens concerned that the uk will apply eu law concept in a
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manner that is consistent with eu law after brexit. but we failed to agree that the open court ofjustice must play an indispensable role in ensuring this consistency. this is a stumbling block for the eu. there are others. number one, a bag gap remains between our positions on family reunification. we want existing rights to continue for this citizens concerned. number two, the export of social benefits also remains to be discussed. and three, citizens need some provide administrative procedures. the uk stated its intention to put in place a streamlined system. we are
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looking, david, forward to hearing the details about this new system. 0n the financial settlement, an expert group had detailed talks on technical aspects, and those talks we re technical aspects, and those talks were useful. the prime minister said two things in florence. first, that no member state should pay more, and no member state should pay more, and no member state should pay more, and no member state should receive less because brexit. second, that the uk will honour commitments taken during its membership. this week, the uk negotiating team made clear that applying the first principle would be limited to 2019 and 2020, and the uk excellent also that it is not in
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a position yet to identify its commitments taken during membership. for the commitments taken during membership. forthe eu, commitments taken during membership. for the eu, the only way to reach sufficient progress is that old commitments undertaken at 28 are honoured at 28. on ireland, we had constructive discussion, and we made progress with some areas. as david just said, both the eu and the uk recognised that islands is a unique situation. —— ireland is a unique situation. —— ireland is a unique situation. any solution would need to be informed by the special circumstances of the island of
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ireland. asl circumstances of the island of ireland. as i mentioned several times, we must respect the integrity of the single market, and the good friday agreement in all its parts. we also confirms our commitments towards maintaining the common area and drafting common principles. ladies and gentlemen, we have had a constructive week. yes, but we are not yet they are in terms of achieving sufficient progress. further work is needed in the coming weeks, and coming months. in three weeks, and coming months. in three weeks from now, it will be an opportunity for me to top of the
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negotiations with president juncker and president task and the 27 heads of state of government. i also look forward , of state of government. i also look forward, next week, to the european parliament resolution, which is important. i hope that a new dynamic, created by the prime minister in florence, will continue to inform our work. let's leave its here, and we will pick up in the week of the 9th of october, when we left off this week. and i want to thank you for your attention. there is time now for questions, and i will start with you. then right from the bbc. two
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questions if i may. david davis, your time today is clearly more optimistic. there is a warmer atmosphere in here. there are obvious a big stumbling blocks, in particular the role of the ecj and enforcing citizens' rights. and a massive issue of money. do you honestly feel that this is a proper negotiation, are you simply type to start —— argue simply trying to pass a series of tests set for good. could you define the phrase, sufficient progress. it is very vague. could it be argued that it is your very narrow interpretation of the negotiating mandate that is holding these talks back. sometimes the questions make me laugh. of course it is a proper negotiation. to ta ke
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course it is a proper negotiation. to take one example today, later on, we will be publishing an updated table of progress on citizens' rights, ensuring our direct outcome of those the graduation. if you look at them, you will see that most of them are now agreed. most of them, all of them, help all are part of the 3 million european union citizens and the one that ian united kingdom citizens, both. and so it is to their advantage. the same thing is true of northern ireland. we have made real progress. it has not been a one—way process at all. broadly thanks to the prime minister's speech last week, we have made further progress. we will hopefully cnn future very significant progress on the question of the limitation period, but again, that is not a one—way process. translation: britain decided to
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leave the european union. that was their sovereign decision. the united kingdom government confirmed that they wished to use the customs union and the internal market. those are decisions that are heavy with consequences. serious decisions. and as david said earlier on, there are consequent it consequences in all sorts of areas, human, social, and legal, economic, technical. so you should not be surprised at these rounds, which are all useful, some of them have more stumbling blocks, some of them have disappointments and some of them take steps forward. and we have had important clarifications this week. but you
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should not be surprised that this ta kes should not be surprised that this takes time. the necessary time. and as far as takes time. the necessary time. and as faras i'm takes time. the necessary time. and as far as i'm concerned, i mean, remember that this is not the usual kind of negotiation for the european commission. we don't have a text or a directive to defend. i'm the negotiating person here in the commission, and i have 27 heads of state and the european parliament. i have their trust. my job state and the european parliament. i have their trust. myjob is simply to make sure that we find a way and mean for to make sure that we find a way and meanforan to make sure that we find a way and mean for an orderly withdrawal, an agreement with the united kingdom at the point when they leave, which is much better than leaving without an agreement, and we do it by protecting the interests of the 27, and we make sure that the european taxpayer doesn't have to carry the burden of decisions taken by the citizens of the united kingdom. i am
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making sure that we preserve the integrity of the internal market, and the non—negotiable autonomy of decision—making amounts to the 27 deciding their own destiny. 0nce again, as david has said and i have set myself, i think it's partly that theresa may's speech made it possible to unblock the situation to some extent, and give a new dynamic to the situation. but we are far from being at a stage, and it will ta ke from being at a stage, and it will take weeks or maybe even months, where will be able to say, yes, 0k, there has been sufficient progress on the principles of this orderly withdrawal. bruno, times of london. first, for mr davies. the arrangements for
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european nationals living in britain, direct effect of the withdrawal treaty, it went be able to be amended by parliament, the sharper it will not be able to be amended by parliament, european law will still apply through that. it sounds awfully like the european communities act, 1972. can you explain to us why it will not be? we see the figures for liabilities in the 2016 budget at our all—time high, 238.8 billion. can you tell us which part of those commitments britain will honour, britain said it would honour those commitments, and which part it will not? mr barnier, on october nine, we are hearing that britain will make new concrete proposals on these areas to you. if they go some way to addressing your concerns, would you ask the european
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council on the 19th of october to adjust your mandate in order to be able to get deep into the nitty—gritty of a transition arrangement? thank you, bruno. it doesn't look anything like the 1972 act to me, let's see what it is. we have been discussing this issue, it's essential, the right of eu citizens in the uk. we have accented from the start that there is a need for certainty. —— we have accepted from the start. we are aiming to produce that without allowing the european court of justice produce that without allowing the european court ofjustice within and on cases in the uk. and this is the compromise we're working towards. it's not unusual, there are plenty of arrangement where we have treaties that defy —— define or the united kingdom do. as for the negotiation, we're not been in negotiation, we're not been in negotiation standing here! —— as for
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the money, we are not negotiating standing here! translation: i a nswered standing here! translation: i answered earlier on about sufficient progress. imean, we i mean, we could go into the details. but if you read the positions, and that have been made public with full transparency by the commission, and by my team, i think you can see what we expect. it's all about sustainable protection of citizens of free rights in time. coherent interpretation of those rights on both sides, and the financial settlement. we are asking for the fa ct settlement. we are asking for the fact that the commitments entered into by 28 be honoured by 28. no more, no less. and on ireland, we're making progress. as as soon as possible, and i take my responsibilities as i would a
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negotiator serious, as soon as i can say we are there in the first sequence underpinning an orderly withdrawal, as as soon as possible, i will recommend to the european council that we start the second stage in the sequence, which would then be addressing the request that then be addressing the request that the uk government put forward through this theresa may, for the first time, i mean, david had mentioned it, but this rendition period, i mean. the 27 are not surprised by that request from the united kingdom for a transition period. i have the basic document which is my mandate, and which does indeed describe the conditions under which we would be able to discuss in good time, and i hope that will not bea good time, and i hope that will not be a long time, but discuss transition period. and if you read
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that document, because it is extremely specific and precise, i was not surprised by this request by the united kingdom side. as i said, in orderto the united kingdom side. as i said, in order to get to that second stage, which may well have a link with the orderly withdrawal, but we are still under article 50, and that means that, the drafts of the treaty organising their withdrawal of the united kingdom. as i said, i have a clear mandate which i have to respect. but orderly withdrawal include a certain number of separation issues, we've just discussed some of them. and amongst them is the possibility of a transition phase. as soon as i can, as soon as i can transition phase. as soon as i can, as soon as i can see transition phase. as soon as i can, as soon as i can see that there is real progress and report back to those who gave me the mandate, i
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shall do so. and then we will be able to be deleted move on to the second stage in the sequence. thank you, a question for mr barnier. sorry, david davis said on monday that the financial settlement could only probably be resolved at a later stage when the future relationships clarified. have you come round to his point of view? if not, surely the chances of moving forward on this discussion are still blocked. transition —— translation: transition -- translation: on the substance first of all, thanks to those two sentences which i deem
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constructive, as i said, very soon after, spoken by the prime minister in florence, theresa may, i mean, it helps to clarify things. it's very important that the prime minister says, and it's been specified that it is 2019-2020, that the says, and it's been specified that it is 2019—2020, that the member states of the union will not have to pay more or receive less, that's very useful. but if you're only talking about two years, that's not the end, is it? the second sentence is also important, of course, that is also important, of course, that is recognising that the commitments entered into by the united kingdom by the period where they were a member of the union, up to the time of their withdrawal, all of those commitments will be honoured. but taken together, in a pooled fashion, if you will, will have to be respected and honoured by 28. and i
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hope that we can clarify that point moving forward, and i hope we can get a clear undertaking on that point. which is the translation of what i've been calling sufficient progress on that subject, which is not able to be divided from the rights of citizens and the question of ireland. as i say, they are a whole, they are not able to be this associated. as to the rest, being very frank, objectivity, i see no logical and coherent link between discussions that we will have and open as soon as possible, and which must be ambitious about the future, what i have been calling the new partnership between the united kingdom and the european union in many areas, trade, security and defence, fighting terrorism, perhaps other areas as well. that is a
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discussion for the future. there is no link, there's no possible link, the way we see it, no possible link that discussion and a discussion about separating, the separation issues. and the commitments entered into in the past. thank you, i'm afraid that your link the floor way to britishjournalists! my question is on citizens, but it's a little bit on the side. after the orderly exit, well the uk be free to impose visas to, let's say, polish, bulgarian, romanian citizens, perhaps another country, or a commitment not to do so would be pa rt of commitment not to do so would be part of the deal? and since i don't
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think i will be able to ask follow—up question, if this is not pa rt of follow—up question, if this is not part of the discussions, why? because the interests of several countries are very seriously concerned. yes, i mean, you're strict question, we will be free to, we will be no longer an of the eu, we will be able to operate and migration policy as we see fit. that does not mean that people from the european union countries will not be the come to britain and work in britain but we will have that freedom. —— will not be able to come to britain and work in britain but we will have freedom. translation: that is a question rather for david and for me? we're discussing objectively all of a
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sudden texts where some uncertainty is created in general terms. —— all of the subject. we have talked about the 14 of the subject. we have talked about the 1a documents that the uk has published and we have published 1a document on allsorts of subjects, wherever there is uncertainty. the first point is people, citizens, we wa nt to first point is people, citizens, we want to make their rights secure, reciprocated on the basis on non—discrimination, on the basis of continuity of rights. all of those rights acquired up to brexit and rights acquired up to brexit and rights acquired up to brexit and rights acquired by families, that's very important as well. and that security should be down for their whole life. and we're talking about everything acquired up to the point of brexit. 0n the 29th of march, 30th of march of 2019 at midnight, the united kingdom becomes a third country. and that applied in every
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area, itjust country. and that applied in every area, it just becomes country. and that applied in every area, itjust becomes a third country. and after that, as you know, we have this objective to work together on a partnership, a partnership which will be our future relationship which i hope will be a very strong partnership in many areas. but that's a discussion and we can discuss migration, immigration, the conditions on both sides, but that is a subject which relates to the future of our relationship with a country which has become a third country, a com pletely has become a third country, a completely different legal situation. this concludes the press conference. the meeting will start in five minutes. thank you. studio: the conclusion of the fourth round of brexit discussions in brussels. slightly different interpretations, i think it's fair to say, from michel barnier and david davis. david davis said that they had been making steps forward,
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he was leaving bottles optimistic, michel barnier, we have had a constructive week but not yet they're in achieving sufficient progress. 0ne they're in achieving sufficient progress. one of the main sticking point seems to be the role of the ecj, the european court ofjustice in protecting citizen's writes, that is still thorny issue in these discussions also. also around the financial commitments that the uk is prepared to pay once it leaves the eu. but we will have much more analysis of what's been said there by those two brexit negotiators throughout the programme. we're going to stay with the subject. with 18 months to go until the uk officially leaves the eu, bbc news is looking at the central aspects of brexit over the coming months, starting with travel and trade. let's go live to our business presenter susannah streeter who's at the london gateway for us. i'm at the border post at the london
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gateway ports in human consumption unit, and behind me, vets and other health officials are doing inspections and checks on food that has arrived in countries like brazil, honduras and nicaragua. brexit has huge applications the way the uk imports and exports goods. many businesses are concerned about the prospect of increased tariffs and losing friction less borders. let's hear from hull and losing friction less borders. let's hearfrom hull which is one of the biggest ports in the uk which deals with trade from the eu. the port of hull is a gateway to europe, with daily ferry to rotterdam, and, like this one, does to zeebrugge. between them, these routes can handle 800 lorries and containers every day. no routine customs inspections means no time lost at either end. that's critical for logistics businesses. like this hessle—based firm which doesn't want any extra customs checks after brexit.
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our customers' goods need to be delivered on time, in full. so if there is any delay, it's going to affect us both on our import and export. it would be additional costs to us, and we would have to pass those onto our customers. this company is already preparing for more bureaucracy, though, and says it can cope. others think technology at ports and on ferries could keep things moving. whether it's numberplate recognition systems, or whether they'll have some sort of fingerprinting system for the drivers, so that they can do, before the ferry actually docks, the checks have all been done. the organisation that represents shipping companies agrees with the uk government's proposal for a transition period towards a new streamlined customs arrangement, but says ports and their customers need enough time to prepare. it is possible that there might be technological solutions, and we'd like to see government invest more in things like access to ports, widening roads and improving rail links.
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but frankly, we cannot begin to talk about how long a transitional arrangement would be until we know what we are transitioning towards. the government now hopes to convince the eu to allow the kind of frictionless trade these businesses need to keep costs down and goods moving after brexit. that's the perspective from hull. i'm now in one of the inspection ru ns i'm now in one of the inspection runs here at the london gateway ports, and this is where the inspectors are inspecting cooked beef which have come from brazil. it's been in cold storage for about a week. they have a lot of different containers to inspect here at the port, they're going to be opening it, checking it, see that it smells right and running contests to make sure that the meat does not any bugs. —— running tests. this is what
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happens to goods that a ride from non—eu countries, but what about eu countries? could eu goods have to be inspected in the same weight? let's talk tojon inspected in the same weight? let's talk to jon averns who inspected in the same weight? let's talk tojon averns who is inspected in the same weight? let's talk to jon averns who is from inspected in the same weight? let's talk tojon averns who is from the port authority, and you are in charge of health and inspection here. what do you think the prospects are for how you deal with eu goods post brexit? do you think the state could come under the same scrutiny and could the board paper that? city of london corporation is responsible for taking public health controls on third—party goods but we would like to see the same controls as there are currently in the eu for goods post brexit. so what we would like to see is some form of mutual recognition, equivalence agreement with the eu so that we can carry on with the eu so that we can carry on with existing arrangements. what happens if there is not a deal? could the port cope with increased inspections, could it expand at the
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rate that it would need to?m inspections, could it expand at the rate that it would need to? it would cause significant impact on the ports. four times the amount of meat that comes in from the eu that comes in from third countries, said it would cause a problem which is why we're saying, to retain the current have controls, that would protect the consumerfrom have controls, that would protect the consumer from any and all health problems and i think we can do that adequately with existing controls. there are inspections taking place here, and 30 different containers and they are inspected that bring food in from non—eu countries. this has huge indications for the whole shipping industry. what is going to happen post brexit, could more intersections be needed ? happen post brexit, could more intersections be needed? let's talk to guy platten, the chief executive of the uk chamber of shipping. tell me what he wanted to see, what do you want to see thrashed out in brexit negotiations for uk shipping? our principal concern is not with a
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container terminal like this, where its modern and great, it is the 40% of trade that comes in on ferries. it's essential that long enough transition period to any new agreements is made, the supply chain would be severely disrupted. agreements is made, the supply chain would be severely disruptedlj agreements is made, the supply chain would be severely disrupted. i have been speaking to port officials here who have said, london gateway is not at all at its full capacity. it could expand another half again. so it could cope if we did have to treat eu goods in the way that we treat eu goods in the way that we treat ee —— non—eu goods. treat eu goods in the way that we treat ee -- non-eu goods. at the moment, 40% of the trade that comes in on ferries, lorries tan up on the road networks, onto a ferry, onto the other side and access road networks, it is seamless and no friction, there is no space at these ports like boat —— dover. there's
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just not the physical space or systems in place to cope with sudden cliff edge in the event of no agreement. but couldn't the business that would go through dover come through a like this instead? it is —— port like this instead? so there is growth that could be exploited? the problem is that the supply chains are just the problem is that the supply chains arejust in the problem is that the supply chains are just in time, so it's not a question of going onto ships and sailing and waiting to be cleared, it hours from reduce it a destination. that's why they need them all on and roll sector, it is seamless and friction less. not to say that these places cannot cope with increased traffic, but the role on and role of trade works really well because you get perishable goods and car parts, for a couple coming through on a daily basis. goods and car parts, for a couple coming through on a daily basislj have looked at the port operating this morning, the computer systems are sites that they can bring in
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different types of goods on the same container and they will know which paris they have got to be imposed —— robert harris have to be imposed so that could be generated to a greater scale. —— which paris have to be imposed. could this work with the right technology in place? imposed. could this work with the right technology in place ?m imposed. could this work with the right technology in place? it needs an investment in technology and facilities. sites such as this are amazing, it an edible facility but it needs to be —— incredible facility but it needs to be repeated elsewhere. we would like ideally to have a mirroring of the current agreement, as it is in visit by the government, some sort of the spoke agreement which contains frictionless trade likely have at the moment. there is a huge amount of trade going on here. i saw a big ship being unloaded, 9000 containers on it. this port can take those mega ships which can carry 21,000
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containers. there is a lot of optimism here at the port of gross, however, as you heard their there from guy platten, there are many questions that remain about how this could operate. there are computer systems out there that do manage the different kind of tariff arrangements of different countries but it is a very different and difficult operation. here on bbc news, we will be looking outside the port little bit later to find out more of the implications for the uk shipping industry post brexit. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. he passed away peacefully at home from natural causes. hugh hefner was the teenage
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boy who never grew up. a pioneer of sexual liberation in the 1960s, bunny girls, nightclubs, a corporatejet called big bunny, all made possible by the magazine he started at his kitchen table. with marilyn monroe as its first centrefold, playboy was an instant hit. in its heyday it sold 7 million copies a month. i suppose you are the world's most famous hedonist. certainly in a very public way. are you a happy man? oh, yes. never more happy than now. hugh hefner lived the lifestyle portrayed in his magazine but feminists accused him of reducing women to sexual objects. sales eventually dwindled and he retired to his mansion, where the partying continued. at the age of 86, he married his third wife, crystal harris, a playboy playmate 60 years hisjunior. hugh hefner wasn't only about sex. he also published some great writing and fought equality. he also published some great writing and fought inequality.
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he died at the playboy mansion in la, surrounded by friends, the self—styled godfather of the sexual revolution. james cook, bbc news, los angeles. headlines coming up at then we will have analysis of the brexit negotiations. let's have a look at the weather first. we have had some pretty wet weather overnight, but thankfully, much of the rain has cleared away towards the rain has cleared away towards the east. the skies are brightening up, we have had some lovely sunshine this morning. this is one example in sterling, from one of our weather watchers. some weather watcher picture, some cloud in the north—east of scotland, we will see the rain continuing their into the afternoon. for many of us, it is looking fine and dry. the last of
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the cloud will tend to clear away from the east, still the odd shower perhaps that going into the afternoon, across south—west england and wales, plenty of sunshine, sunny spells across much of england with temperatures up to 18 to 20 degrees. going to feel quite pleasant this afternoon. scotland hanging onto some cloud and out subframe. for elsewhere across scotland, —— outbreaks of rain. ulcer across scotland, mostly dry. northern ireland, some outbreaks of rain coming through, an area of low pressure is moving in from the west. a cold front moving in through the night into the early hours of friday morning. the breeze will pick up, associated with that rain. it could be heavy at times as it tracks east towards many areas but it will break up towards many areas but it will break up the little bit into the early hours of friday morning. temperatures 13 or 1a degrees. friday morning started wet, needing
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an first friday morning started wet, needing anfirst thing, friday morning started wet, needing an first thing, but the rain will move eastwards and as it clear the way, things will brighten up. with sunny spells into the afternoon, showers across scotland, northern ireland and feeling fresher. 15 to 16 degrees, warmer towards the south—east. 0n 16 degrees, warmer towards the south—east. on saturday, not looking too bad, dry weatherfor south—east. on saturday, not looking too bad, dry weather for many with sunny spells but more rain into the north and west. things become much more uncertain into the forecast as we going to sunday. there's a good reason for that, we have got hurricane lee and tropical storm maria in the west atlantic. these are going to cause some problems in the weather forecasting models. are going to cause some problems in the weatherforecasting models. they will weaken, they will become former hurricanes. as they track north and east across the atlantic they will get mixed up with another area of low pressure so it's looking very complicated into sunday. essentially it means it will be more wet and windy on sunday. more details on the
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website. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. after the fourth round of the brexit negotiations in brussels, the brexit secretary, david davis says progress has been made. is david davis, mischa laborious as a still more to be done. we managed to create clarity and some points, on others, however, more work remains to be done. and we are not there yet. i believe that, thanks to there yet. i believe that, thanks to the constructive and determined manner in which both sides have instructed these negotiations, we are making steps forward. the prime minister defends the free market in a speech marking 20 years since the bank of england was granted independence. a free—market economy operating under the right rules and regulations is the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. after the cancellations,
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ryanair is threatened with legal action for allegedly misleading customers over their rights. also, why one of england's brightest cricket stars may miss this winter's tour to australia. as video footage emerges allegedly showing ben stokes in a brawl outside a nightclub, he apologises to the ecb and is said to be devastated. and kim kardashian and the rapper azealia banks are among those paying tribute to the founder of the playboy empire, hugh hefner, who's died at the age of 91. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier says that a "new dynamic" has been created in the brexit negotiations following theresa may's speech in florence last week. he said that some progress had been made but more work is needed. the brexit secretary david davis said that "decisive steps forward" have been made, but admitted that there remains a disagreement for the overall final financial settlement, along with the border in northern ireland. the brexit secretary gave a short summary of the discussions, which he says were driven by the prime minister's speech in florence last week. theresa may's speech in florence had at its heart a desire to drive progress this week. it was intended to change the dynamic and instil a real momentum. it set out a clear, pragmatic approach designed to have
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secured an agreement that works for all sides. it's built on a hugely significant work that has gone on a cross government over the last year that has seen us publishing 1a papers detailing the united kingdom's vision for the future, and two white papers. this week, my negotiating team in brussels are armed with the guilt thinking that underpins the proposals set out by the prime minister. well, inevitably, this requires further discussion, i believe that thanks to the manner in which both sides have conducted these negotiations, we are making decisive steps forward. after four runs, when i look across the full range of issues, i feel we have made significant progress on the issues that matter, increasing certainty for citizens and businesses, providing reassurance to our eu partners with the gusty financial obligations, and agreeing to some of the key principles and
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elation to some of the issues arising in ireland. the european union's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier says the latest round of talks on britain's departure from the eu have made some progress, but more work is still needed, and looked ahead to his meeting with the other european heads of state to discuss where he'll discuss the progress made in the negotiations. ladies and gentlemen, we have had a constructive week, yes. but we are not yet they are in terms of achieving sufficient progress. further work is needed in the coming weeks, and coming months. in three weeks, and coming months. in three weeks from now, the actor robert european council will be an opportunity for me to take stock of the negotiations with president juncker and president task and 27 heads of state and government. and also, i look forward to, next week,
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the european parliament passed back resolution, which is important. i hope that the new dynamic created by prime minister made's speech in france will continue to inform our work. we can speak to our correspondent ben wright, in brussels. a new dynamic after florence. was there much at the end of this latest land of negotiations in the way of tangible progress in your opinion? it is very hard to measure, but i think there probably was. certainly, in terms of the atmospherics, it was a very different press conferences to the one they had after the last round of negotiations, which was pretty fractures, both sides rather exasperated with each other. annotation rights of use on the faces of both david davis and michel barnier. this does seem to have changed significantly this time
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round. ido changed significantly this time round. i do think the speech by theresa may made a difference, but do some of the meetings that have been going on between the uk and various foreign ministries. i think there is a sense that we have to get on with this, and that is hurting both sides. 0n on with this, and that is hurting both sides. on several fronts, there was progress. “— both sides. on several fronts, there was progress. —— that was heating both sides. i think the right will be enshrined in a treaty and put into uk law, and that has done something to reassure the ee. they wa nt something to reassure the ee. they want the uk to go further, and there is still the knotty question of whether the european court of justice should be the final arbiter of other are not those rights have been breached. 0n the money issue, macro one is happy that the uk has got its cheque—book out, and will honour is contributions, but he is quite clear that there are other liabilities and commitments that they need to be talked about it. best to expand on what they might
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be, but said they were not issues they would not discuss today. those remain the key issues in unlocking is one of this negotiation and getting on to the trade talks. i asked michel barnier about sufficient progress that he is looking forfor sufficient progress that he is looking for for that second phase, and he said that he hoped that the baby be there within weeks or months, but he said if these three issues, the irish border, money, citizens' rights, they need to be resolved before the second phase of talks can be opened. the overall tone was more positive than at the end of the last round, but i think there were different assessments from the two on how much progress had been made. michel barnier was talking about, as soon as i see real progress, the quicker we can move the second phase. would you agree that the two sides perhaps have different views at the stage on how
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far along they are? yes, i think so. i think there remains a disagreement between them about the mechanism, the process, the choreography of this negotiation to begin with. certainly, on the island question, it is the ukip us view that it makes no sense whatsoever to put the question of the border in a box and try and resolve it is now without trying to bring into play the issue of the future trade agreement. i think that is a source of exasperation on the ukip us sides, andi exasperation on the ukip us sides, and i think the star remains from michel barnier and his team irritation of the ukip us withholding on the money fund. they wa nt withholding on the money fund. they want that resolve now before the second phase can begin. putting that aside, i do think that when we to be standing here now after a news
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conference like the last one, the brexit negotiations would be looking in serious trouble. that has not happened. thank you very much. theresa may has mounted a strong defence of the free market a day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a "crisis of legitimacy". in a speech to the bank of england to mark 20 years of its independence, the prime minister said the financial crisis and globalisation had brought concerns that the economy was not working for everyone, but capitalism remained the best way for living standards to grow. lets head to westminster now — and our political correspondent, jonathan blake. perhaps, arguably, there has never been a stacker or clear choice between the two offers between the two largest political parties at the moment, if you compare and contrast jeremy corbyn's speech yesterday to what theresa may had to say today.
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yes, almost polar opposites. we should be careful about setting up theresa may's speech as a direct response to jeremy corbyn's theresa may's speech as a direct response tojeremy corbyn's speech yesterday, it would have been in the diary for some time. the timing is perhaps a happy coincidence as it gave the prime minister an opportunity to set up and defend the free market economy as the only sustainable way of running the economy in the uk, as she sees it. she says it was the greatest editor of collective human progress ever created, so his stance defence of the free market. she said the government would continue on that basis, being tough on spending, but also acknowledging that this system had its limitations as well, and the government needed to address where it was not working for some people. despite that, she set out by the free market economy was, in her words, the only way of raising living standards on a sustainable basis. we should never forget the
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opportunity if a market economy gives us when working on the right basis. life inspect it increases, and entered mortality files. absolute poverty trends. access to education is widened, and rates of a d soup vomit. but in cultural life is extended, and more people have the chance to contribute. it is an open, free—market economies that technological changes are made that open and transform lives. personal freedoms and liberties by the sugars protection. a free—market economy, operating under the right laws and regulations, is a greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. it was the new combination that led societies out of that
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nissan stagnation and into the light of the modern age. theresa may speaking at the bank of england this morning. it is in stark contrast to whatjeremy corbyn said at the labour party conference in brighton yesterday. he set out his vision for the uk economy, which was a different. in his words, the system is broken, and a radical new way of running the economy is needed. he set out the policies we are now, you buy from the labour party manifesto, scrapping tuition fees, lifting a public sector pay cap, but also, more broadly, the themes of government investing more in the national economy and industry, saying it much more active role in stimulating the economy, the nationalising utilities and other industries and taking them back into public ownership. far from, industries and taking them back into public ownership. farfrom, as theresa may, capitalism and free market been the ordinary, jeremy corbyn said a new way was needed. the capitalist system dell faces a
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crisis of legitimacy stemming from the crash. now is it time that government took a more active role in restructuring our economy. now is the time that corporate boardrooms we re the time that corporate boardrooms were held accountable for their actions, now is the time that we developed a new model of economic management to replace the field dogmas of neoliberalism. that is why labour is looking not just to dogmas of neoliberalism. that is why labour is looking notjust to repair the damage done by as verity, but to transform our economy with a new, dynamic role for the public sector, particularly by the private sector has evidently feels. there you have it, both sides of the argument. it is worth noting that it is significant the prime minister is having to make this argument at all. for some time now, many years,
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decades there has been a consent is input is broken —— a consent is in british politics that the free—market economy is the right way to go. there is now a change, and the prime minister is now finding yourself defending something that has been the status quo under many yea rs has been the status quo under many years under both labour and conservative governments. jeremy corbyn, on the other hand, arguing that radical change is needed. he says politicians are all the same? ryanair has been threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights after the company cancelled a further 18,000 flights. the civil aviation authority said it had launched "enforcement action" against europe's biggest airline over its handling of the recent disruption — it's the first step towards court action. sarah corker reports. we wa nt
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we want them to make it crystal clear to every passenger but they are entitled to. we do not think that it's a big task. the law is very, very clear. there is no disputing the law. it is just about line—up us willingness to do that. as it is saved money, or is itjust barely organise? i do not know why they have not done it, but all i know is that consumers should not have to choose between low—cost fa res have to choose between low—cost fares and their legal rights, and at the moment that seems to be what's ryanair as saying. you can either have cheap fares on legal entitlement. that is not good enough. you wrote to them last week. what happened then? we got one right, but we did not get action. so, we wrote again yesterday, and i have hurt in the press that the intent to do things, but we have not seen any sign of that action. they have not been in touch with you? they have said they are complying
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with the rules. not sure who they have been in touch with, they have certainly not been in touch with me on my enforcement team on this issue. rya nair has issued a response, saying... "we already comply fully with all eu261 legislation, are meeting with the caa and will comply fully with whatever requirements they ask us to." a business correspondent described by the intervention could mean for the airline. they are clearly getting very frustrated with ryanair. there getting very frustrated with rya nair. there had getting very frustrated with ryanair. there had been warnings over the past few weeks that ryanair was not doing what it should do under the terms of that regulation. it sets out passengers' rights if theirflight it sets out passengers' rights if their flight cancelled. we are dealing with the pretty unusual situating here. there have been a lot of complaints that the company is not doing what it is a poster,
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which is getting passengers to their destinations, if necessary, on another airline. how worried is ryanair at the moment because of this intervention from the cea, and what more can you do? reunion is going to be under a lot of pressure. it is under pressure from cea and consumer groups as well. the problem is that they have a role via model. the passenger's right to compensation is a lot greater than the price of the ticket. that is something they have restricted over in other years. now, they may try delaying tactics or they may try to comply. if they delay, they could end up in court. the rest for the airline is, leaving aside the cute issue of the number of pilots and the availability of pilots to cover all the five you then find then
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compounding those with a customer confidence issue. it is certainly a big pr gap. what they came out with yesterday, this pre—emptive cancellation of flights on its winter schedule. this was decided to put the issue to bed. it is easier to cancel now than do it at the time and have to give more compensation. what they have done is create a new pr gap by saying passengers are not entitled to fly on other airlines. 0n entitled to fly on other airlines. on some of those, they may have no choice. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. the brexit negotiators have both given more upbeat assessments on progress after the fourth round of talks in brussels. theresa may has said continuing to deal with the country's debts is the way to strengthen the economy. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights following thousands of flight cancellations. let's catch up with all the latest
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details in sport. england have started their own disciplinary procedures after ben stokes putts—mac arrest after suspicion of causing actual bodily harm outside a bristol nightclub. a video has appeared that appears they show the fight. we haven't independently verified this video coming up, and just to one year, before we sure you get, it is graphic. it shows a man who very closely resembles ben stokes involved in a brawl. he is seen to repeatedly throw punches towards two men. we know that one man needed to go to hospital for treatment for facial injuries. stokes also suffered a fracture to his board in his right hand on the night of that sentiment. he was named in the as is quite yesterday,
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and he has retained the vice captaincy. let's get more from our sports corresponded who is at lord's. we know that the police will look at that video as part of the investigation, and we all wait to see if any charges will be brought. that is right. i think that is certain to happen now. ben stokes was arrested in the early hours of monday morning. he was released without charge but under investigation. that investigation by even and somerset police is continuing. in the meantime, in light of this video, we understand that seniorfigures at light of this video, we understand that senior figures at the ecb have discussed the matter this morning. it could be that interim measures are brought against ben stokes later today. as for the player himself, we understand he is said to be in a fragile condition, however the
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magnitude of what is alleged to have happened, what is said to have happened, what is said to have happened, what is said to have happened, what appears to have happened, what appears to have happened, and has apologised to the ecb for that. for now, he remains in the as is quiet, and retains the vice captaincy, but events do seem to have something of the momentum now. we will have to see what the ecb do in due course, but this video perhaps changing things, perhaps from all sides of the story. we will have to seek now had events played out over the coming days, perhaps evenin out over the coming days, perhaps even in the coming weeks. many thanks for now. ben stokes was dropped from yesterday's batch at the oval puts up in england when the one—day series. moeen ali made a quickfire start before rain stopped play. they were chasing a big total— the hundred and 57 posted by the wendy's. they won by six runs under
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the duckworth—lewis method. it is over the weeks before the start of the women's ashes series, and the opening match in italia is sold out. cricketers shall you say there is no more tickets available. the multiformat cdcs two more one—day games after that. ashall your currently hold the ashes. a very good night for a british teams in the champions league last night. three wins out of three. the most impressive was in madrid as chelsea came from behind to beat atletico madrid 2—1 with the last kick of the match. antoine griezmann had put the home side in front. this was the one for chelsea in injury time. diego
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costa, theirformer for chelsea in injury time. diego costa, their former striker who has died atletico madrid, not looking too happy in the stands. celtic started the group staged by getting some by paris st germain, but last night they beat anderlecht. scott sinclair getting the peak of the goals. two wins out of two for manchester united. they beat a very poor cska moscow team. romelu lukaku is good twice. that is the sport for now. but to the website for a full update, but i will be back after the one o'clock news. a serious case review into the killing of a teenage woman at a residential home for people with asberger‘s syndrome has found how death could have been predicted and prevented. she had previously told staff that she was being stalked and that conroy scared her. in 2015, after conroy was jailed, melissa's family said she had 2believed wholeheartedly
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in the care system" as the best place to help her. to get more on what the report said, i'm joined now by our correspondent helena lee... some incredibly distressing details about this case. perhaps he will begin by reminding our viewers about the background of it. this is in 2014. minister was in a high dependency mental health unit in bristol. she was placed with jason conroy, and it was delpo she was attacked by him. he strangled her. he entered two dag her to the now bedroom. that is when staff realised something was going on. she was taken to hospital, and a couple of days later, she died in hospital. dukakis took place in 2015 jason was convicted, and was sentenced to a minimum of19 years convicted, and was sentenced to a minimum of 19 years in prison. the judge said he was a serious danger
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to the public, particularly young women. millicent reported to staff that she was been sought by jason and that she was scared of him. as we mentioned in the introduction, one of the key findings of this is that michel barnier‘s death could have been prevented. —— melissa death could have been prevented. there is an extensive report into the findings. some of the findings include that jason conroy was described as having extreme sexualised behaviour as far back as 2007 when he was and a different residential school. their comic he tried to attack a been a member of staff. he went on in 2009 again to try and attack a different female member of staff, and different it it says on —— assessment of him in 2013 concluded that he was a high risk of physical and sexual harmful
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behaviour. we have had a statement from the residential home by melissa was then saying that they are deeply shocked by this brutal act. this season ‘s november 2014, when melissa died, they have worked tirelessly to bring necessary changes under the guidance of releva nt changes under the guidance of relevant bodies, but they say that they must learn lessons from this and work much better in the future together. finally, we have also had from melissa's father, james, who has spoken to the bbc. he has said it is shocking the amount of m ista kes it is shocking the amount of mistakes that were made. he is responding to their support. he said, my daughter has taken the brunt of it all. they were both let down. if you read the report, with jason was let down, and has daughter. it is heartbreaking. thank you very much for that. police are calling for children in schools to be taught what to do in the event of a uk terror attack, and are also warning
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eyewitnesses to flee the scene, rather than trying to film atrocities on mobile phones. the call follows a number of attacks in the uk this year, including the manchester arena bombing, which targeted people at a pop concert. andy moore reports. i've trained in taekwondo for 16 years. the new video, aimed specifically at young people, features some famous faces, with a message that police hope is becoming familiar to the british public. do you know what i'd do in a knife or gun terror attack? i'd run. hide. tell. this campaign has been launched against a backdrop of a wave of terror attacks, including the manchester arena bomb, where many young people were killed and injured. their message is to run if you can, hide if you can't, and then tell police about the threat as soon as it is safe to do so. after the parsons green attack on the tube in london, some people stopped to film a partially exploded device that was still on fire. police are taking this opportunity to remind everyone that their first priority is their own safety.
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they should move rapidly away from any danger. hello, you're through to the nspcc hotline. the nspcc is also involved in this campaign. they have been contacted by 300 young people worried about terrorism since april. police are hoping this new message will be taught in schools and colleges to all 11 to 16—year—olds. remember, run. hide. tell. andy moore, bbc news. the organisation responsible for managing grenfell tower has been stripped of its contract to run social housing for kensington and chelsea council. the decision was taken unanimously at a special meeting of the council last night. before the vote, residents criticised the council's track record of rehousing survivors. 20 families affected by the fire are now in permanent accommodation and a further 52 have accepted offers in principle. the sunshine looking claudius here,
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andi the sunshine looking claudius here, and i am quite happy to see that if it is miserable with you somebody rubbing it in the fact that they have sunshine. many of you have, except across the northern isles and are very except across the northern isles and are very far east of east anglia. still a chance of rain there. much improved conditions moving in from the west. not much in the way our bees. at 21, you will feel every bit of it. there is no escaping the fact that the cloud and wind and rain is gathering all the well. it will eventually manifest quite widely across the western south of the british isles. not a cold night thanks to the breeze from the site. the cloud cover makes for a fairly miserable start to friday. northern ireland will be slightly brighter.
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the rain moving eastwards. brighter skies eventually in scotland, but with a peppering of travellers. it will be a market if there was eastern inside of the details. i will see you later. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines. the eu's top brexit negotiator
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michel barnier says good progress has been made during the latest round of talks with david davis in brussels. we managed to create clarity on some points. 0n others, however, more work remains to be done. and we are not there yet. however, more work remains to be done. and we are not there yetlj believe that thanks to the constructive and determined mandarin with which both sides have conducted these negotiations we are making decisive steps forward. —— determined manner. the prime minister has defended the free market, hailing it the greatest agent of collective human progress. it comes one day afterjeremy corbyn told the labour party conference that capitalism was facing a crisis of legitimacy. it's an open free—market economies that technological breakthroughs are made, which transform, improve and
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save lives. it's an open free—market economies that personal freedoms and liberties find their surest protection. a free—market economy operating under the right rules and regulations is the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. ryanair has been threatened with legal action from the civil aviation authority for persistently misleading passengers about their rights, after they announced further flight rights, after they announced further flight cancellations yesterday. england all—rounder ben stokes is said to be fragile and devastated and has apologised to his bosses, after his arrest on suspicion of assault. and in a moment, environmental groups are urging the uk to protect one of its most remote overseas territories, the south sandwich islands. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, says a ‘new dynamic‘ has been created in the brexit negotiations following theresa may's speech in florence last week. mr barnier said progress had been made on the financial settlement and citizens' rights,
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but more work was needed. the brexit secretary david davis said they'd made ‘decisive steps forward', but admitted that there remains disagreement over the uk's final liabilities, along with the border in northern ireland. 0ur political correspondent ben wright was watching the press conference and questioned both negotiators on the strength of the discussions between the two parties. he asked if there have been sufficient progress for trade talks. david davis, your tone today is more optimistic, there's a warm atmosphere in here, but there are obviously big stumbling blocks, in particular, the rule of a cj in enforcing citizens' rights and the massive issue of money, the european union clearly want commitments for more. do you honestly feel this is a proper negotiation, or are using the trying to pass a series of tests the eu is setting you? and mr barnier, could you define more clearly for us
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please the phrase sufficient progress? it's very vague. couldn't it be argued that it is your very narrow interpretation of the negotiating mandate that is holding these talks back? sometimes the questions make me laugh! 0f these talks back? sometimes the questions make me laugh! of course, it's a proper negotiation. we hear every round with 100 officials and ta ke every round with 100 officials and take one example today, i mean, later on today we'll be publishing an updated table of progress on citizens' rights that shows the direct outcome of those negotiations. if you look at them you will see most of them are now green, as they term it. it's an agreement between us. most of them come all of them, help all or part of the 3 million european union citizens and the 1 million united kingdom citizens, or both, and so it's to their advantage. the same thing is true of northern ireland, where we made real progress. it's
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not been a one—way process at all. thanks to the prime minister's speech last week we have made tangible progress in other areas and i hope we'll see in future significant progress on the question of the limitation period over the coming due course, but of course, that's not a one—way process —— implementation period. translation: the government confirmed that they wish to leave the customs union and the internal market. these are serious decisions and as i said earlier on there are complicated consequences in those areas, human,
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social, financial, economic, technical, so we shouldn't be surprised at these rounds, some of them have more stumbling blocks, some of them have disappointments and some of them take steps forward, and some of them take steps forward, and we've had important clarifications this week, but you shouldn't be surprised that this takes time. the necessary time for stop and as far as i'm concerned, remember that this is not the usual kind of negotiation for the european commission. we don't have a text are directed to defend. i'm the negotiator here the commission and i have 27 governments, heads of government or state, and the european parliament, and myjob is simply to make sure that we find a
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way and means for an orderly withdrawal that is an agreement. an agreement with the united kingdom at the point where they leave, which is much better than leaving without an agreement, and that we do it by protecting the interests of the 27 and that we make sure that the european taxpayer doesn't have to carry the burden of decisions taken by the citizens of the united kingdom and making sure that we preserve the integrity of the internal market and the non—negotiable integrity of autonomy of decision—making amongst the 27 in deciding their own destinies. so once again, as david said, and as i have said myself, i think that it's positive that theresa may's speech made it possible to unblock the situation to some extent and give a new dynamic to the situation, but we are far from new dynamic to the situation, but we are farfrom being new dynamic to the situation, but we are far from being at a stage, and
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it will take weeks or maybe even months, where we will be able to say yes, ok, there's been sufficient progress on the principles of this orderly withdrawal. michel barnier david davis speaking in brussels earlier. there are reports of widespread disruption at airports around the world due to a software problem with an international check—in system used by a number of airlines. passengers have reported problems checking in at airports including jon donnison is following the story for us. what exactly is the problem? we are getting reports of delays at a lot of airports. this is not airport specific. it's actually a centralised global operating system run bya centralised global operating system run by a spanish company called amadeus. they represent i think some 90,000 different travel agents, tens of thousands of airline sales offices that are used by more than 435 airlines, so we have problems of delays, checking in at airports,
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from gatwick to melbourne, singapore, all around the world. i think there will be lots and lots of airports affected because this is not related to the airports themselves, it's this centralised operating system. ok, so some check—in desks at an airport might be fine and others might not be. check—in desks at an airport might be fine and others might not hem depends which airline you are flying with but as i say, more than 400 different airlines use this amadeus system. we've had a statement from amadeus, they say what they had a network issue, that has now been resolved, but we have had lots of people posting pictures on social media showing long lines at check—in desks all around the world. albums may be resolved, but there continues to bea may be resolved, but there continues to be a knock—on impact —— problems may be resolved. do we have any idea how long the backlog will take? we don't. i've spoken to contrast their lines in australia and singapore airlines and they said there were no delays or cancellations of flights at this point, about 45 minutes ago,
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but they were working through backlogs of passengers who may be getting delayed checking in. ok, jon donnison, thank you. the children's charity, unicef uk, says orphaned refugee children with relatives in britain should be able to come here to live with theirfamilies. it says bringing them directly to the uk would make them less likely to set out on perilous journeys to other parts of europe, and would stop them being exploited by criminal gangs. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. the perilous route to europe for thousands of refugees. amongst them, children travelling on their own, hoping to eventually reach relatives in the uk. as an ambassador for the children's charity unicef, the actor michael sheen has met many families from syria displaced by the war there. unicef is campaigning for unaccompanied under—18s with family in the uk to be able to come here directly. at the moment, you can't apply to be reunited with your grandparents, or older siblings,
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or aunts and uncles, unless you are already in europe. so what that's doing is it's making young, unaccompanied children have to take that incredibly dangerous journey to get to europe, just to have a chance to be with the only family they have. 0mar, a syrian refugee whose identity we are protecting, is getting messages from his teenage brother, still trapped in their home country. he wants to bring his brother here directly, and fears for the teenager's future if he stays in syria. he faces the risk of being recruited and drafted, you know, by different factions. so everyone is trying to recruit these young people. the home office says its approach is to resettle children and their families directly from conflict regions, and that unaccompanied children may be eligible to come to the uk under the vulnerable children's resettlement scheme. june kelly, bbc news. we have had this statement from a
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person for the home office. environmental groups are urging the uk to protect one of its most remote overseas territories — the south sandwich islands. the group "great british oceans" wants to end fishing and commercial activity on the uninhabited islands to preserve their natural habitat. one of the islands featured in david attenborough's "planet earth ii", documenting the hostile environment its penguins faced on a daily basis. if you are fond of penguins, this will have you on the edge of your seat! is plenty of food in these waters, but to exploit it the penguins have to list risk their lives. music
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life here is dangerous in the extreme. oh, my goodness! that was so
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dramatic! joining me now is our science reporter, victoria gill. amazing camerawork. tell us, for people who don't know, i'm not entirely sure myself, whether south sandwich islands are? they are so remote, that camera crew was some of the very few people on earth ever to have set foot there. i think 12 people on that island. by the right on the edge of the antarctic. basically whether south atlantic meets the antarctic. their incredible remoteness is one of the reasons they haven't been exploited to this point. they are administered by the uk come under the jurisdiction of the uk, one of our overseas territories, but whereas the neighbouring larger island of south georgia saw a lot of wailing and ceiling and human activity on the 20th century, the south sandwich owners did not, so this extra level of protection would set them aside for research and conservation. of protection would set them aside for research and conservationlj for research and conservation.” think they are being described as one of earth's last wildernesses and human history is full of examples of
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where people have arrived in a particular location and within a short period of time that place's species, animal and plans, short period of time that place's species, animaland plans, have short period of time that place's species, animal and plans, have been perhaps wiped out or irreparably damaged, so what needs to happen to give the south sandwich islands that extra level of protection? essentially at the moment the south sandwich islands is within what's called a marine protected area. but already restricts fishing and any human activity, like mining. there are some administrative issues with that marine protected area that means that fishing can still happen and there's about 5 million pounds sterling fishery that operates there at the moment. now what this group that encompasses greenpeace, the rspb and a group called pugh have come together to say is the uk should set this aside as a complete factory, so the marine protected area becomes a total ban on any fishing, any mining and human
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activity. some antarctic researchers have raised concerns about that, because they want to be able to monitor and watch over the islands and do research there, because one of the things that is really important about this part the atla ntic important about this part the atlantic —— antarctic is it the critical barometer for climate change as well. the sea ice slices through the south sandwich islands so they want to be able to watch it. so while this group are asking the uk to absolutely ban all fishing and human activity, and set this aside for research and protection, there are some concerns about what that could do. in terms of the people who have commercial interests there, our discussions ongoing to give them some sort of compensation for stopping that activity? presumably they are not happy about this proposal. at the moment there is a group that is the south sandwich and south georgia government that operates out of the falklands, that looks after if you like the south sandwich islands, and they monitor that fishery. at the moment they are conducting a five yearly review of how effective the protection, that
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marine protected area, has been. so what a lot of scientists want to do is to wait until the evidence comes in from that review, to sayjust how well protected the south sandwich islands are, what extra levels of protection they need from the evidence, the scientific evidence, from that review. because it's under review at the moment, that's why these groups have come together to urge the uk to slap a blanket ban on human activity in that area and keep the wilderness free from human exploitation in the future. victoria gill, thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the european union's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, says the latest round of talks on britain's departure from the eu have made some progress, but more work is still needed. theresa may has said continuing to deal with the country's debts is the way to strengthen the economy. ryanair has been threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights following thousands of flight cancellations. scientists in china say they have
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achieved a world first by altering the dna in a human embryo. it enabled them to correct a single error out of 3 billion letters of our genetic code. the researchers we re our genetic code. the researchers were able to remove dna mutation that the blood disorder beta thalassaemia. it's thought the approach could one day other inherited diseases. with 18 months to go until the uk officially leaves the eu, bbc news is looking at the central aspects of brexit over the coming months, starting with travel and trade. brexit has huge implications for how the uk is able to import and export goods. business owners who trade with europe are concerned about how the prospect of tariffs and losing frictionless borders will affect their day to day operations. in a moment we'll get the position in hull, one of the biggest ports which deals with trade from the eu from katy austin.
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but first to alastair fee, who looks at the more global outlook from southampton. the port of southampton handles around 14 million tonnes of cargo each year. and supports 15,000 jobs. the vast majority of business, that's goods coming in and going out, is trade with countries outside of the eu. that gives companies based here a unique perspective on brexit. we're not dealing with intra— eu trades, we're dealing with ships coming deep sea from the far east, the americas, india pakistan, so our trades here are not essentially european trades. so we are sheltered from those impacts. that confidence is borne out by a boom in another direction of travel. this is the uk's number one port for exports. and that, for the most part, means cars. nowhere in the country handles more vehicles.
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hundreds of thousands pass through here every year. over 95% of the units handled here are going outside the eu, so it's really an exciting time. really, there's nothing anticipated right now on the table where we see it's going to be a major impact for us, our markets, the markets that we are dealing with. but expansion elsewhere at the port tells a different story that's more vulnerable to brexit. i'd like them to leave everything as it is. frictionless borders, the same tariff systems and free movement of goods. this customs warehouse sends goods to europe that for now enjoy free passage with no further duties paid. ijust can't see how you can end up in a system that would work if every single thing that was sent out of here had to be imported again into france. like elsewhere, there are unanswered questions about the potential for disruption and delays. but southampton's focus on export and its relationships outside of the eu means that for now, this port enjoys more
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certainty than most. the port of hull is a gateway to europe, with daily ferries to rotterdam, and, like this one, to zeebrugge. between them, these routes can handle 800 lorries and containers every day. no routine customs inspections means no time lost at either end. that's critical for logistics businesses. like this hessle—based firm which doesn't want any extra customs checks after brexit. our customers' goods need to be delivered on time, in full. so if there is any delay, it's going to affect us both on our import and export. it would be additional costs to us, and we would have to pass those onto our customers. this company is already preparing for more bureaucracy, though, and says it can cope. others think technology at ports and on ferries could keep things moving. whether it's numberplate
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recognition systems, or whether they'll have some sort of fingerprinting system for the drivers, so that they can do, before the ferry actually docks, the checks have all been done. the organisation that represents shipping companies agrees with the uk government's proposal for a transition period towards a new streamlined customs arrangement, but says ports and their customers need enough time to prepare. it is possible that there might be technological solutions, and we'd like to see government invest more in things like access to ports, widening roads and improving rail links. but frankly, we cannot begin to talk about how long a transitional arrangement would be until we know what we are transitioning towards. the government now hopes to convince the eu to allow the kind of frictionless trade these businesses need to keep costs down and goods moving after brexit. the government has announced that it
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is banning two groups under the terrorism laws, after it says they we re terrorism laws, after it says they were identified as aliases of the already prescribed far right group national action. you may remember yesterday police investigating the national action group made arrests. these two groups are called scottish dawn and ennis 131 and the government says they are aliases of the already prescribed national action group and they are therefore to be banned, under terrorism laws. hugh hefner, who founded playboy magazine, has died at the age of 91. playboy enterprises said he passed away peacefully at home, from natural causes. 0ur la correspondentjames cook looks back at his life. hugh hefner was the teenage boy who
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never grew up. hugh hefner was the teenage boy who never grew up. a pioneer of sexual liberation in the 1960s, bunny girls, nightclubs, a corporatejet called big money, all made possible by the magazine he started at his kitchen table. with marilyn monroe as its first centrefold, playboy was an instant hit. in its heyday it sold 7 million copies a month. mr hefner, i suppose you are the world's most public hedonist.” suppose so. hugh hefner lived the lifestyle portrayed by his magazine but feminists accused him of reducing ruder sexual objects. sales eventually dwindled and he retired to his mansion whether partying continued. at the age of 86 he married his third wife, crystal harris, a playboy playmate 60 years hisjunior. harris, a playboy playmate 60 years his junior. hugh hefner wasn't harris, a playboy playmate 60 years hisjunior. hugh hefner wasn't all about sex. he also published some great writing and fought in equality. he died at the playboy mansion in la surrounded by friends.
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the self—styled godfather of the sexual revolution. james cook, bbc news, los angeles. ina in a moment, the news that one, but first, the weather forecast. in a moment, the news that one, but first, the weatherforecast. hello, not a bad afternoon across many parts of the british isles but for many it didn't start like that. if your day started close to the weather system, your morning didn't look anything like this at all. tha nkfully look anything like this at all. thankfully the system is on the move, dragging the worst with conditions come even in places away from eastern shores, this was taken at seahouses earlier this morning on the northumberland coast. you can see there was still a legacy to cloud to be had awhile ago across parts of east anglia and the south—east. i'm not quite done with the cloudy story just yet. through the cloudy story just yet. through the afternoon we'll find increasing amounts of cloud bringing the threat of rain in the parts of northern
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ireland. there's a lot of fine and dry weather to be had, say for the noah dry weather to be had, say for the n oa h lyles dry weather to be had, say for the noah lyles in scotland, still stuck with a combination of wet and windy fair. with a breeze in the south—west, it will feel very pleasa nt south—west, it will feel very pleasant for late september. the top temperature probably about 20 celsius or so. do make the most of it. because through the course of the evening and overnight we begin to push this next band of cloud and wind and rain in through northern ireland, then it will begin to affect the western side of scotland, down through the west of england, through wales. all the cloud and breeze coming in from the south will help to keep temperatures up but it doesn't make for a very pleasant combination to start your day on friday. slow progress on the weather front, but progress nonetheless. rainfall totals won't mount up too much, no issues with flooding here. brighter skies following on behind with a peppering of pretty sparky showers across the western side of scotla nd showers across the western side of scotland and ireland. the top temperature of the day, around 20.
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saturday starts on a pleasing note, but all the while the cloud and rain begins to fill in across northern ireland and gets across the irish leader parts of southern scotland, the north—west of england, back into the north—west of england, back into the western fringes of england and wales. the further east you are, the better your day will be. it's an enormous but, there is uncertainty. big areas of isobars, reinforced by the remnants of hurricanes we've been talking about from the atlantic, so sunday will be a stormy day, potential for atlantic, so sunday will be a stormy day, potentialfor disruption atlantic, so sunday will be a stormy day, potential for disruption to travel. keep tuned to the forecast. coming up next, the news that one. join the papers at 10:40pm for a look at tomorrow's headlines. ryanair is threatened with legal action for persistently misleading passengers about their rights. it follows the cancellation
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of thousands more flights well into next year, affecting 400,000 travellers. it is just crazy, isn't it? it isjust crazy, isn't it? how can they be so disorganised? it is ridiculous. airline regulators are threatening "enforcement action," a first step to going to court. we'll have the latest. also this lunchtime. there's a new constructive dynamic in the brexit talks, but more work to do, according to europe's lead negotiator. we managed to create clarity on some points. 0n others, however, more work remains to be done and we are not there yet. there's a staunch defence of the free market by theresa may,
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